A Turkish wedding full of joy and emotion

A Turkish wedding full of joy and emotion

Last weekend I was invited to a wedding in the city of Bodrum, Turkey. Okay, I wasn't technically invited, it was Emma and I was tagging along. And I invited my camera.

This was my first time in the country and also my first Turkish style wedding. While it wasn't a conservative traditional Muslim ceremony, it was full of local traditions, which I believe represent modern Turkish customs. It also had so many foreign guests that the whole party was a mixture of everything.

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Carrying the weight of tradition in Spain's Holy Week

Carrying the weight of tradition in Spain's Holy Week

Twenty-four-year old welder Antonio Caparrós breaks into tears while he hugs friends and relatives in a storage room  with two gigantic, intricate, and beautiful statues and another few dozen sweaty men. He confesses that he has been released from a physical and emotional burden after having carried, along with another 39 men and for nearly five hours, a 1.1 ton statue of a Pieta, the depiction of a dying Jesus Christ in his mother’s arms.

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The Buddhist temples of Kyoto are full of cute Japanese kids

The Buddhist temples of Kyoto are full of cute Japanese kids

Kyoto is possibly Japan’s most important city historically. It was not only the imperial capital of the country for over a thousand years, but also the birthplace of none other than Super Mario. And Nintendo. Yeah, I like Nintendo.

In 2011 I was in Japan shooting the FIFA World Cup of Clubs, which Barcelona F.C. eventually won. I was on my way from Tokyo to Toyota, where one of the matches took place, and stopped for a day trip on Kyoto. 

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8 hours in Portugal: a quick visit

8 hours in Portugal: a quick visit

In between flights from Brazil to Spain I had 8 hours to spend in Lisbon and I wasn't going to spend it all in the airport. I had been to Portugal only once before when I was 5, so it doesn't really count.

We took the bus directly to the Praça do Comércio (Commerce Square), on the margin of the rio Tejo (river Tagus). This place is commonly known as Terreiro do Paço, because it was the location of the Paços da Ribeira, the royal palace of Portugal, home to one of the largest libraries in the world and that burned down after the 1755 earthquake and tsunami. Most documents regarding the discovery of Brazil were lost, as were hundreds of paintings.

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